Probation Workshop


Welcome to the MiraCosta College Probation Workshop

Lecture Notes

Welcome to the MiraCosta College Online Probation Workshop. There are a number of reasons students find themselves on probation. You will learn why you are on probation and what you can do to remedy your situation. At the end of the presentation you will take a quiz to assess your knowledge about probation.


Presentation Goals

Lecture Notes

At the end of this presentation you will be able to define probation and calculate your Grade Point Average. In addition, you'll learn how to improve your GPA and avoid scholastic dismissal.


What is Probation?

Lecture Notes

We define two different types of probation at MiraCosta. Academic Probation refers to students who have completed at least 12 semester units and have a cumulative grade point average that is below a 2.0, which is a C average. Progress Probation refers to students who have attempted at least 12 semester units, with less than 50 percent of the units completed with an evaluative grade. That means that the student has received "W", "I", and "NP" marks for the majority of units attempted.


When is Probation Calculated?

Lecture Notes

Academic and Progress Probation are calculated for the spring and fall semester on the basis of the student's grades earned including "W's." Summer grades are included in overall calculations for the spring and fall semesters. In addition, probation is posted on the student's permanent record.


Reasons Students End up on Probation

Lecture Notes

The next three slides will outline various reasons students end up on Probation. One reason that students end up on probation is that they quit attending class and do not officially withdraw. Instructors are required to give a grade if the student is still on their roster. If you stop attending and don't do any course work, the Instructor will still use his/her grading system for the entire course to calculate YOUR grade. You will probably receive an F. Reason #2: The student is not willing to make the commitment to study. Generally, students should plan on studying 2 hours per week for each unit they are taking. For example, if a student is taking 4 units she should plan to study 8 hours per week. Reason #3: The student worked full time and took more classes than he could handle. If a student is working more than 15 hours per week he should not take more than 12 units. The more hours worked the fewer units should be taken.


Reasons Students End up on Probation Continued page 2

Lecture Notes

Reason #4: The student was absent too much (illness, working too many hours, personal problems, etc.) and therefore missed instruction and assignments. Reason #5: The classes were too difficult for the student. This doesn't mean the student wasn't smart enough, just that the student enrolled in a course in which his current skills were not at the correct level. For example, the student took Philosophy 101 although his writing skills were not at a college level yet. Reason #6: The student didn't make use of Tutorial Services. Tutoring is provided at both the Oceanside and San Elijo campus free of charge to enrolled students. Click on the Tutorial Services hyperlink for more information.


Reasons Students End up on Probation Continued page 3

Lecture Notes

Reason #7: The student's reading and/or study skills need improving. The student should investigate taking a reading course, especially if his assessment scores placed him in Reading 830. If study skills are an issue consider taking Counseling 110 (College Success Skills). Reason #8: The student encountered unforeseen circumstances at the end of the semester and did not consult with the instructor about a grade of incomplete. Incomplete academic work for unforeseeable, emergency, and justifiable reasons MAY result in an "I" grade. The condition for the removal of the "I" shall be stated by the instructor in a written record. Reason #9: The student's academic goals were not clear. The student should see a counselor to discuss educational and occupational goals. Reason #10: The student did not explore receiving financial aid in lieu of full time work. Click on the Financial Aid hyperlink for more information.


How can I calculate my G.P.A.?

Lecture Notes

A G.P.A. will be calculated on a 4 point scale. The highest G.P.A. possible is a 4.0. Each grade has a certain point value: A equals 4, B equals 3, C equals 2, D equals 1, and F equals 0. You calculate the grade points by using the following formula: grade value multiplied by units earned equals grade points. The formula to calculate a G.P.A. is: Total Grade Points divided by the total number of graded units earned.


Calculating Grade Points

Lecture Notes

This is an example of how to calculate Grade Points. There are several grades in the left hand column with their corresponding Grade Value. For example, in the first row we have a grade of "A" that has a grade value of 4. Let's say this is a 3 unit course. Therefore, we would multiply the grade value and the units to get the grade points. In the first row, we would multiply 4 and 3 and the result is 12 for the grade points.


First G.P.A. Example

Lecture Notes

Let's calculate a grade point average for this example. You'll see a table listing column headings for classes, grades, units, grade value and grade points. There are five classes listed with the grades and units for each class. Have a piece of paper and a pencil ready. Copy the table onto a piece of paper. Write the corresponding Grade Values and Grade Points per class where the question marks appear on the table.


First G.P.A. Example Continued page 2

Lecture Notes

Add up all the units and all the grade points, and calculate the G.P.A. What G.P.A. did you come up with?


First G.P.A. Example Continued page 3

Lecture Notes

Remember the GPA formula? The GPA is calculated by dividing the total Grade Points by the total units earned. You should have calculated the G.P.A. to be 2.79.


G.P.A. tool

Lecture Notes

Click on the hyper link to use a G.P.A. Calculator to help you determine your grade point average. This may help you in our next example.


Second G.P.A. Example

Lecture Notes

Now, let's do another example. This student got very sick during the semester and missed many of his classes. As a result, he had a hard time keeping up. In this table are his final grades and corresponding units. Using this information figure out his G.P.A. Have a piece of paper and a pencil ready. Write the corresponding Grade Values and Grade Points per class on a separate piece of paper. Remember each grade has a certain value: A equals 4, B equals 3, C equals 2, D equals 1, F equals 0. You calculate the grade points by using the following formula: units earned multiplied by grade value equals grade points. The formula to calculate a G.P.A. is: Grade Points divided by number of units attempted equals G.P.A.


Second G.P.A. Example Continued

Lecture Notes

Did you come up with 0.83? If you did, you are correct. The student is on academic probation because her G.P.A. is below 2.0. To bring up her G.P.A. to 2.0 or higher, this student will have to earn A's and B's. If the student gets C's, the G.P.A. won't rise above 2.0.


How to "Drop" a Course

Lecture Notes

It would have been better for the student in the previous example to have withdrawn or dropped his classes instead of getting low grades. Dropping classes won't affect your G.P.A. There are two methods you can use to drop a course. You can drop a course online through SURF. Click on the hyperlinks to see a demonstration or read directions. Make sure you know the drop deadline, which can be found in the course schedule every semester. The second method involves obtaining an official drop card from the Admissions and Records Office. Complete the drop card and submit it to Admissions and Records by the drop deadline. You do not need the instructor's approval or signature to drop the course. The drop deadline can be found in the class schedule or your instructor's syllabus. You can obtain a printout online through SURF or from the Admissions and Records office showing you have "officially" dropped the course.


Methods to Improve your G.P.A

Lecture Notes

There are three methods to improve your G.P.A. The first method is to get grades of C or better in your classes. We highly recommend aiming for A's and B's to raise your G.P.A. above a 2.0. The second method is course repetition. The third method is academic renewal. Course repetition and academic renewal will be explained in the next two slides.


Course Repetition

Lecture Notes

Any course with a mark of "D", "F", "NC", or "NP" can be repeated up to two times to improve the grade beyond the "D" or "F." The new grade and grade points earned will be counted in computing the G.P.A. as if the repetition were another new course. Units attempted, grade, and grade points of the first grade will be subtracted from the totals of that semester and will be noted on the student's transcripts as repeated.


Academic Renewal

Lecture Notes

Another method for improving the student's G.P.A. is academic renewal. The following regulations permit students who earned bad grades to change their transcripts. Such students may petition the Admissions and Records Office for exclusion of prior substandard course work under the following conditions: The petition arises out of a consultation between the student and a counselor. A maximum of 15 units may be removed from calculations of the cumulative G.P.A. The units proposed for exclusion were taken at MiraCosta College. All proposed excluded course work was completed at least two years prior to the petition. The student completed a minimum of 15 units with a G.P.A. of 2.0 or better (on a 4.0 scale), with at least nine (9) of the fifteen units taken at MiraCosta College, subsequent to the completion of the units being petitioned for exclusion. The excluded units remain on the record annotated as excluded for satisfaction of requirements for a degree or certificate and for computation at MiraCosta College only. The student petitions for exclusion of units under these regulations only one time. No excluded units can be reinstated. Any units excluded by other institutions will be recognized as excluded by MiraCosta College and will be included in the maximum 15 unit allowance. Appeals to any portion of these regulations will be referred to the Committee on Exceptions.


What is Dismissal?

Lecture Notes

At the end of spring semester, a student who is on "academic probation" after three consecutively enrolled semesters shall be subject to dismissal for the following fall semester if the student earned a cumulative grade-point average of less than 2.0 in all units attempted. At the end of spring semester, a student who has been placed on "progress probation" shall be subject to dismissal if the percentage of units in which the student has been enrolled for which entries of "W", "I", and "NP" are recorded in at least three consecutive semesters reaches or exceeds 50 percent at the end of spring semester. (Summer semester is NOT considered a consecutive semester). Once a student is dismissed, the student must sit out a semester or file a petition to be reinstated that must be approved by the Committee on Exceptions (COE). COE petition forms may be obtained from the Admissions and Records Office. The petition must state extenuating or mitigating circumstances, if the student wishes to have their dismissal overturned. After a student sits out a semester they may return to the college. If you are placed on academic or progress probation or dismissed from the college it will be noted on your transcript.


How to Avoid Dismissal if you are on…

Lecture Notes

The approach to avoiding Academic Probation versus Progress Probation is different. If you are on Academic Probation, you can avoid dismissal by doing the following. 1) Select appropriate courses in consultation with a counselor, and 2) Drop classes officially before receiving a failing grade because it is better to have a "W" than to have a "D" or "F" on your transcript. If you are on Progress Probation, you can avoid dismissal by doing the following. 1) Select appropriate courses in consultation with a counselor, 2) Do not drop courses because you cannot afford to get another "W", since that may be the reason why you are on Progress Probation, and 3) Consult with your instructors about your situation. It is also important to consult with a counselor if you are experiencing unforeseen circumstances before dropping any course.


Quiz Time

Lecture Notes

We hope that this probation workshop has been helpful to you in explaining why you are on probation and outlining different methods to help you improve your grades. Now you are ready to take the Probation Workshop Quiz. Click on the Probation Quiz hyperlink to open the quiz. Feel free to review the workshop as many times as needed. We highly recommend you also meet with a counselor to create or update your educational plan. Click on the counselor hyper link if you would like to make an appointment to see a counselor. Best wishes for your academic success.